What Can You Plant this Summer?

Whether you’re a seasoned or a novice gardener, the big question when beginning any gardening project is what to plant. Of course, you want to plant things that will grow well both in your area and during the season you decide to plant them,...

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Whether you’re a seasoned or a novice gardener, the big question when beginning any gardening project is what to plant. Of course, you want to plant things that will grow well both in your area and during the season you decide to plant them, but each region is so different. University of Florida comes to the rescue again with a month-by-month growing calendar for each season.

Since Summer has already begun, let’s look first at what grows best from June through early September.

Flowers: It’s best to plant annual blooms that like the sun during the summer. Some of these include celosia, torenia, and ornamental pepper. In the middle of summer, it’s best to limit yourself to only heat-loving plants such as coleus, kalanshoe, and vinca.

If you are more of a bulbs person, some great summer options are the butterfly lily, gladiolus, Aztec lily, and the walking iris. Various types of elephant ear can also add texture.

Herbs are pretty finicky, and with the hot temperatures we see in Florida, it would probably be best to start herbs from full-fledged plants rather than seeds. Hearty herbs that do well when grown from plants include ginger, Mexican tarragon, and rosemary. Be sure to keep an eye on your rosemary; it can run away from you if you aren’t careful. Mint and basil can be planted later in the summer as things are just beginning to cool off.

If you are considering items for your vegetable garden, pumpkins, peas, beans, tomatoes, and carrots can be started in mid to late summer for a fall harvest. Just be sure to solarize your garden and kill all weeds before planting.

This is just the tip of the ice berg. Visit University of Florida’s website and centralfloridagardening.com for more suggestions and advice.

Happy gardening!

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